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Recipe of the week: Pattishapta

India, the land of curry – but also known for Taj Mahal, Bollywood, yoga, ayurveda and the Indian cuisine. On the 15th August, India celebrated it’s 67th year of independence. YLC has teamed up with Sudipa Duttaroy to bring you the very best of India.

Pattishapta-dessert

India is a diverse country and so is the cuisine. Therefore the cooking varies a lot across the country depending on the climatic conditions, religious beliefs and historical influences – just to name a few. Indian curry is ubiquitous and today found in every nook and cranny of the world. But curry isn’t the be all and end all, there’s more to Indian cuisine, much more…

This week we give you the dessert: Pattishapta.

Pattishapta is a sweet dish from the eastern part of India – West Bengal. Usually eaten in the winter, is one of our family favourites. Pattishapta is usually made from a special kind of jaggery but can be made with sugar. The best pattishaptas that I have ever tasted were made by my grandma and I have learnt the recipe from her. Pattishaptas were made during festivities but for me, eating pattishapta in itself is a festival and needs no special excuse!

It’s a crêpe with a coconut filling. I am more than happy to serve this very traditional Indian dessert as weekend breakfast for my daughter, who’s a pancake afficionado and loves it to bits.

 

What you need:

For the Batter for Crepes/Pancakes:

2 cups All Purpose Flour

1/4 cup Semolina (Mannagryn in Sweden)

2 tablespoons Rice Flour

4 cup Whole Milk

For the filling:

3 cups Grated Coconut or desicated coconut

1 cup Sugar

4 tablespoons Milk

1/2 teaspoon Cardamom Powder

 

What to do:

Heat a pan and add the Coconut and sugar, stirring continuously.

Add milk and cardamom powder, stirring till the mixture is moist and turns sticky. The consistency should be granular.

Mix the batter ingredients and esure there are no lumps. Then pour a laddle full of the batter on heated frying pan to make the crepes, place a portion of the filling lengthwise and roll the crepe. Devour!

Some like it hot, some like it cold, I like it the day after.

 

Sudipa Duttaroy

 

About Rebecca Martin

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